US government issues Thanksgiving ransomware warning

Officials are calling on U.S. businesses and government organizations to take extra precautions against hackers this Thanksgiving following several ransomware attacks in previous holiday periods. Ransomware Warning

A notice released on Monday by the FBI and the U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) asked organizations to identify key IT security employees who may be on call in the event of a ransomware attack. The advisory highlights how disruptive hacking preparedness has become a daily task for US businesses and agencies after a series of high-profile ransomware attacks on critical US infrastructure this year.

While we are not currently aware of a specific threat, we do know that threat actors are not taking vacations, ”CISA Director Jen Easterly said in a statement. “We urge all organizations to remain vigilant and report any IT incidents to the CISA or the FBI.

Ransomware gangs like to strike on weekends or during the holidays when organizations are understaffed and potentially off guard. In an incident over the weekend of July 4, a hacker hacked Kaseya, a major US IT vendor, in a ransomware attack that affected up to 1,500 businesses worldwide.

Recent trends from 2021 show malicious cyber actors launching serious and hard-hitting ransomware attacks during holidays and weekends, including Independence Day and Mother’s Day weekend, ”said the CISA and the FBI.

A study by security firm Cybereason of more than 1,200 security professionals working in organizations that have suffered a ransomware attack found that nearly a quarter of those surveyed still did not have plans for it.  specific emergency to deal with ransomware attacks during holiday periods.

Ransomware isn’t the only consideration when it comes to vacation scams. CISA’s UK counterpart, the National Cyber ​​Security Center, issued its own warning on Monday that cybercriminals had compromised customer payment information on 4,000 small business websites.

Other types of hacks rocked American businesses this past Thanksgiving. Sony Pictures Entertainment discovered on Thanksgiving week, 2014, that hackers had stolen tons of data from the movie studio and destroyed some of the company’s computers in the process. US officials then blamed North Korean hackers for the cyberattack.

While we are not currently aware of any specific threats, we do know that the threat actors are not going on vacation, ”CISA Director Jen Easterly said in a statement. “We urge all organizations to remain vigilant and report cyber incidents to the CISA or the FBI.

Ransomware gangs like to strike on weekends or holidays when businesses are understaffed and may not be prepared. In an incident on the weekend of July 4, a hacker broke into a ransomware attack on Kaseya, a large US IT company that affected up to 1,500 businesses around the world.

Trends in 2021 show malicious cyber actors launching serious and powerful ransomware attacks on public holidays and weekends, including Independence Day and Mother’s Day weekend, ”CISA said and the FBI. A study by security firm Cybereason of more than 1,200 security professionals working in companies that have suffered a ransomware attack found that nearly a quarter of those surveyed still did not have contingency plans. specials to deal with ransomware attacks while on vacation.

Other types of hacks have rocked American businesses over the past Thanksgiving. Sony Pictures Entertainment discovered during Thanksgiving week in 2014 that hackers had stolen tons of data from the movie studio and destroyed some of the company’s computers in the process. US officials then blamed North Korean hackers for the cyberattack.

On an advisory Monday, the FBI and the U.S. Cyber ​​and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) ordered organizations to identify key IT security personnel who could be on standby in the event of a ransomware attack. Ransomware Warning The advisory highlights how disruptive hacking preparedness has become a daily task for US businesses and agencies following a series of high-profile ransomware attacks on critical US infrastructure this year.

While we are not currently aware of any specific threats, we do know that threat actors are not taking vacations,” CISA director Jen Easterly said in a statement. “We urge all organizations to remain vigilant and report cyber incidents to the CISA or the FBI. “

Ransomware gangs like to strike on weekends or holidays when organizations are understaffed and may not be wary. In an incident over the weekend of July 4, a hacker invaded Kaseya, a major US IT vendor, in a ransomware attack that affected up to 1,500 businesses around the world.

 Recent trends for 2021 show that malicious cyber actors are launching serious and hard-hitting ransomware attacks during the holidays and weekends, including Independence Day and Christmas Day weekend. mothers, ”according to CISA and the FBI.

A survey by security firm Cybereason of more than 1,200 security professionals working in organizations that have suffered a ransomware attack found that nearly a quarter of those surveyed still had no plans to specific emergency to deal with ransomware attacks during the holiday season.

Ransomware isn’t the only consideration when it comes to vacation scams. CISA’s UK counterpart, the National Cyber ​​Security Center, continued its own warning. On Monday, cybercriminals had compromised customer payment details on 4,000 small business websites.

Other types of hacking have confused American businesses over the Thanksgiving past. Sony Pictures Entertainment discovered during Thanksgiving week in 2014 that hackers had stolen large amounts of data from the movie studio, destroying several of the company’s computers in the process. US officials then blamed North Korean hackers for the cyberattack. Ransomware gangs like to strike on weekends or during the holidays when organizations are understaffed and potentially off guard. In an incident over the weekend of July 4, a hacker hacked Kaseya, a major US IT vendor, in a ransomware attack that affected up to 1,500 businesses worldwide.

A notice released on Monday by the FBI and the U.S. Cyber ​​and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) asked organizations to identify key IT security employees who could be on call in the event of an attack. Ransomware Warning The advisory highlights how disruptive hacking preparedness has become a daily task for US businesses and agencies after a series of high-profile ransomware attacks on critical US infrastructure this year.

A study by security firm Cybereason of more than 1,200 security professionals working in organizations that have suffered a ransomware attack found that nearly a quarter of those surveyed still had no plans. specific emergency to deal with ransomware attacks during holiday periods.